Contents

Computers continually give out small quantities of irritating and poisonous materials. This article explains how exposure risks can be reduced.

Low Level PC Poisons - Computer Fumes Dust And Gases

Low Level PC Poisons - Computer  Fumes Dust And GasesCopyright 2006 Michael MadiganDid you know computer equipment continually gives out small amounts of different gases and fine dusts? Some people are highly sensitive to these.Plastic PC components are one source, as most plastics are unstable and break down naturally over time, especially when exposed to ultraviolet light and sunlight. (That's the reason why they turn yellow and get brittle.)Another source comes from vapour produced from traces of manufacturing materials slowly evaporating.The gases and fumes given off are called 'out-gassing' and only occur in small amounts. But when the equipment is new, the out-gassing is greater and noticeable even to people who aren't particularly sensitive.This is similar to the smell that we get when we first get into a new car - out-gassing from the vinyl, plastic carpet and hard plastic interiors, as well as the wiring.A new computer has a similar smell. So to some extent you can avoid outgassing, at least of 'new' volatile components, by buying a good quality 'used' PC.Other office materials, particuliarly new furnishings, may also outgas - chipboard contains phenolic resins, which release trace amounts of formaldehyde; also carpeting (especially foam padding), paint and fabrics give off obnoxious chemicals when new.People who have been sensitized (by previous exposure) may react badly to even very tiny amounts of these gases, by getting headaches, dizziness, and respiratory problems. The problems may persist even when the original cause is reduced, or disappears. In such a case it's wise to seek qualified medical advice.Casings may also be contaminated by fine brominated phenolic dust originally put on as a fire retardant, which can be blown out by fans, circulation or movement.The best solutions are :-- Initally, to run any new equipment in an empty well ventilated room to allow most of the outgassing to occur before use.- Always work in a room with good ventilation and avoid continual high room temperaturesoutgassing will increase as the temperature rises.Laser printers emit a lot of toner dust, which contains carbon and solvents, and quite a few people are sensitive to it. You can smell it when the printer is on, and especially on freshly printed-paper. You may notice wheeziness, coughing, and sneezing.People working at copy centers and service bureaus often suffer from headaches, and toner dust is the main suspect. NCR paper ('carbonless' paper) can also cause wheeziness.Good ventilation, drawing air away from the operator and filtering out particles, will help reduce these reactions, but effective ventilation in a commercial or home office is sometimes hard to achieve, especially in sealed buildings.You can try going outdoors and breathing deeply for 10 minutes every hour or so. Open doors, maybe have a fan on., and avoid routine (multiple) photocopying every single document.Think long term. Removing even mild poisons from your environment is yet another way to keep safe, stay fitter at the PC and enjoy a healthy computing career!

How to Find a Book Using Online Bookstores

How to Find a Book Using Online Bookstores

Looking for improving your gaming skills by reading some of the best books on professional gaming that are around? That is a good idea, but, and as you may have already noticed, it is easier said than done. Once you go online to one of the many online bookstores such as Amazon and Barnes and Ruble and can type in a phrase you get a long list (if you are lucky) of potential books. What do you do then? How do you know which book suits you? And if you even could figure that out, how do you know the book is worth anything? Many of the authors are pros, but, then, you can also easily land up on amateur writers who are just trying to make a buck. Exactly for this, we have compiled a list of five practical suggestions to help you.1) Reviews and Opinions Matter.One of the most interesting methods of screening authors and books is by reading what other readers have to say about those literary objects. Look up one of the many forums online that focus on books and either ask a direct question or read what others have said. Another option is to look up the book at different online bookstores such as Barnes and Noble and Amazon but also others such as The Literary Guild and Pickabook. (Look them at this list compiled by the World Wide Web Virtual Library: http://archive.museophile.org/bookstores) The reasons for doing this is that for every book you can read reviews from different sites. Do this and you are reducing the chances of reading only promotional material. It goes without saying that opt for those books that receive good reviews. Generally, a book will receive some bad reviews, but look at the majority viewpoint. Note that if the book you wish to buy is new, you will not find reviews. In such a case, you will just have to take a risk.2) Be Specific.One of the methods of searching for a book that interests you is by narrowing down the search by typing a long search term and not just one name. For instance, type down how to play Texas holdem in an online tournament instead of just Texas holdem. Such a search will result in only a few book options. First, look up reviews and views on it and then look at its size and focus of interest. 3) Check the Experience of the Author.Buying a book is just like buying a car. Would you be willing to pay more for a Mercedes? Likewise, check the author or editor. If the author is unknown, tread very carefully. The book might be useless. But remember that its not enough that the author is well known or has years of professional expertise, they must be experienced in the exact field of the subject of the book.4) Check the Printing History of the Author.After checking the authors personal biography and his scope of knowledge as pertains to the issue in question, you should, then, check his style of writing. You will not want to fall asleep on the second page, do you? If their style of writing pleases you, try reading parts of their work. Read articles or portions of other books they have read. Do this to get an idea of whether they can write and whether they are capable of handling complicated issues and putting them across in easy to understand language.5) The Price Factor.When looking at books, the first thing (or the second) we tend to look at is the price. Yes, you should know whether you can afford to buy it or not, but do not make you decision based on whether a book is cheap or expensive. First, check whether the book is what you are looking for. Then, decided whether you can afford it and not vice versa. Likewise, do not just buy a book because its on sale. Remember that if a book is on sale it means that no one is buying it!

Answers to 6 Common Questions About Ink Cartridges

Answers to 6 Common Questions About Ink Cartridges

Inkjet printers produce great quality prints, but buying inkjet cartridges can take a big bite out of your budget. The good news is that there are inexpensive ways to maintain the life and quality of your printer. Here are answers to six common questions about printer cartridges and toner cartridges.1. Do I Have to Buy Brand Name Ink Cartridges?Printer manufacturers have a vested interest in convincing you that buying brand name "inkjet cartridges" is the only option. The truth, though, is that compatible inkjet cartridges are a cheaper alternative to branded "printer cartridges" .2. What are Compatible Print Cartridges?Compatible print cartridges are generic ink cartridges that are made with entirely new components. They are manufactured to meet or exceed the standards of brand name cartridges, thereby retaining the quality and reliability of OEM (original equipment manufacturer) inkjet cartridges - at a fraction of the cost. 3. What are Remanufactured Cartridges? Remanufactured printer cartridges are essentially recycled inkjet cartridges. They have been inspected, cleaned, and refilled with ink. They are typically print tested before they are sold to ensure that they are in excellent working condition. Remanufactured cartridges are usually less expensive than compatible "print cartridges" , which in turn are less expensive than OEM brand name ink cartridges. 4. Are Compatible and Remanufactured Cartridges Made for All Printers?The availability of compatible and remanufactured "toner cartridges" and inkjet cartridges varies, depending upon the brand and model of your printer. Cartridges are made for most models of Epson, Canon, HP, Lexmark, Samsung, Kodak, Brother, Compaq, and Dell printers. 5. Won't Compatible Cartridges Hurt My Printer?If you select the right supplier of ink cartridges, you can rest assured that the ink cartridges will be rigorously tested and that the ink used is of the highest quality. Compatible cartridges won't harm your printer, and the print life usually meets or exceeds that of OEM cartridges. 6. How Do I Find a Good Source of Ink Cartridges?If you want to save money by buying compatible or remanufactured cartridges, the best place to look is online. Not all online ink cartridge suppliers provide equal quality, though. Look for a supplier with a track record; one that has been online for at least seven years and that has supplied cartridges to schools and government bodies is a good choice. In addition, make sure that the supplier you choose will guarantee the quality of its products. Further, to save more money, select a supplier that offers free UK delivery and VAT inclusive prices. Finally, look for service that includes same day dispatch, no minimum order, and secure online ordering.

How to identify Spoof/Phishing emails - Protect yourself from identity theft.

How to identify Spoof/Phishing emails - Protect yourself from identity theft.

What is a spoof email?Spoof emails (sometimes also called "Phishing") are emails that pretend to be from a company or bank. The most common often come from eBay, PayPal, Barclays Bank etc. These emails will then contain a web link, if you click on this link then you will be taken to a login page and asked to enter your details. Most of these scammers go a long way to try and get your details, most spoof emails contain links to identical websites and users are tricked into entering their personal information. If you submit your information through one of these spoof websites then the fraudster has all of your details and can commit crimes using your identity.How do they get my email address?You may wonder how the scammers got your address or knew you were a member of a particular bank or institution. Often it is just good luck on the part of the scammers. They normally do not target individuals, but send out thousands of scam emails to randomly generated email addresses, in the hope that just a few will be successful. They also trawl the web for valid addresses they can use, and swap this information with each other. If you have ever posted on an Internet forum or published something on the web, there's a good chance your address is out there somewhere just waiting to be found. If you have fallen victim before, your address is normally added to a list of 'easy victims', and you are likely to then receive even more scams. How can I identify these emails?Here are 4 simple tests that you can perform on any email you suspect is a spoof. Your email can only pass the test if it passes ALL FOUR of the tests. If your email passes all of the four tests then you can be 99.9% certain that it is a genuine email. If your email passes all four of the tests then we would also advise you to check the "Other Tips" section just to double check that your email is genuine.If your email failsIf your email fails JUST ONE of the four tests then the email is a spoof and shouldn't be replied to and should be deleted immediately from your computer. Even if your email fails the test, I would still advise you to check out the "Other Tips" page for more good ways to spot a spoof email.If you are still in doubtUnless you are 100% sure that your email is genuine, DO NOT click on any links within the email. Contact the company in question (See the "reporting a spoof" page) and ask them to confirm if the email is genuine or a spoof.Test 1 - Who is the email addressed to?Have a look at how the email addresses you. Most spoofs will say something along the lines of "Dear eBay user". This is the very first thing you should look for in a spoof email. Any email that doesn't address you by your name is a spoof. Ebay, PayPal and banks always address you by the name you registered with on their site, they NEVER send out emails saying "Dear valued customer", "Dear member" etc.If your email isn't addressed to you personally then it is a spoof! If your email is addressed to you then move onto the next test to see if it is a spoof email. Some more advanced spoof messages have started to include your name or email address instead of the generic "Dear member" or "Dear user". So even if your email were addressed to you I would strongly advise you to carry out the 3 other tests. Test 2 - Where does the link go?Most "spoof emails" will contain a link telling you to verify your details. You can quickly tell if your email is a spoof by hovering your mouse over the link. When your mouse is over the link, look in the bottom left hand corner of your screen and you will see the "link destination". The destination of a spoof link will usually look something like this:"http://slp.clinker.net.mx/.sh/.a/index.htm?SignIn&ssPageName=h:h:sin:us"Compare this with a real eBay link:http://k2b-bulk.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?MyeBaySellingSummaryAnd you can see the difference. You can easily check if you email is a fake by looking at the first part of the link destination, if the destination is a combination of numbers (102.382.54.23) or a link like the one in my spoof link above then the chances are that your email is a spoof.Any non-spoof link will contain the name of the company in the first part of the link, eg:http://cgi.ebay.co.uk http://cgi.ebay.com http://cgi.paypal.comPlease note: Some spoof links will contain the words "eBay" or "PayPal" in the final part of the link. These are also spoofs! All real emails will only contain the company name in the very first part of the link; after http://. If you still aren't sure if you have a spoof email, move onto the next test.Test 3 - Who really did send you the email?This test may seem a little confusing but don't worry it isn't as difficult as it looks. What we are going to do is find out where the email came from. Most people don't know this but you can trace the origin of your emails in most mail programs. To do this we have to view the "FULL message header", here is how you do this in the following email programs. If your program isn't listed here please contact your email provider for instructions:Hotmail 1. Click on "Options" 2. Click on "Mail display settings" 3. The 3rd option can be used to display the header settings, select "Full" from the check boxes 4. Click on "OK" to save your settingsOutlook Express 1. Right click on the email and select "Properties" 2. Select the "Details" tabNow that we can view the message headers, here is how you identify a spoof:Look in the part of the header that says "Received From". If the email has come from anyone other than the sender it's a spoof. I had a spoof email and performed this test and notice that the email had been sent from a Yahoo account. Obviously a real email from eBay would not have been sent from a Yahoo address!Test 4 - Click on the linkOnly try this if your email has passed the previous 3 tests. Some spoof emails have been known to contain viruses that are activated by clicking on the link. Please ensure that you have a good virus scanner installed on your PC before proceeding. If you have important data on your PC you may also wish to backup that data on a removable backup device.When you click the link in your email a web browser will open and take you to what looks like a legitimate login page. There are two ways to identify a spoof login page, and I will show you both of them! Have a look in the address bar at the top of the login page. Have a look at the http:// part of the URL. Any genuine login page from eBay, PayPal or your bank WONT start with "http://" it will start with:"https://"The "s" in https:// stands for "secure" and is there to show you that you are about to submit data over a secure connection. Any page not starting with https:// is a spoof. The second difference between the two pages is the padlock icon in the bottom right hand of the screen. Notice that the spoof login page doesn't have a padlock, and the genuine eBay login page does. This padlock appears to show you that you are about to submit data over a secure connection. If your login page DOESNT have a padlock icon in the bottom corner of the screen then it is a spoof!Other Tips for spotting Spoofs1. Punctuation Read your email carefully and look for any spelling mistakes. You can be sure that any genuine emails wont contain simple spelling mistakes.2. Adverts? Real emails from eBay don't contain adverts for burger king!3. Hotmail identity check A new feature in hotmail now warns you if a senderID could not be verified. Any spoof email will contain this warning. (please note that recently I received a genuine email from eBay that contained this warning, so don't judge an email purely by this method) 4. PIN number Any website asking for your PIN (personal identification number) is a spoof. Do not enter your PIN number! If you have entered and submitted your PIN then contact your bank immediately.5. Popup boxes Some spoof sites will include popup message boxes like the one below. Genuine sites don't use popup boxes telling you to enter details.6. False sense of urgency Most spoof emails will make you think that your account is at threat if you don't act quickly. This is not the case.7. eBay Messages Any genuine email sent to you from eBay will also appear in the "My Messages" section of eBay. To access your eBay messages, login to ebay and click on "My eBay". On the left hand side of the screen you will see a "My Messages" link. Click on this; if the email you received in your inbox isn't listed there then it is a spoof email.8. Ignore the email address Ignore the email address that the email was sent from. Almost all spoof emails will appear as if they are from a genuine address. Some of the emails I receive are "from":service@paypal.com memberservices@paypal.com awconfirm@ebay.com safeharbour@ebay.com operator_862736743@halifax.com9. Download the eBay toolbar The eBay toolbar is a great piece of software that can be used to spot spoofs. As soon as you enter a spoof website from eBay or PayPal the toolbar will give you a warning telling you that web page is a spoof. The Ebay toolbar is FREE to download. Dan Thompson has been creating websites for over 7 years. You can visit his website and receive 6 free e-books, check out the website on http://www.elpassobooks.co.uk

Be Smart Partition Your Drive.

Being in the computer field for some years, I've seen many people being afraid to save data on their computers. People are so paranoid, but don't really know what to do unless they're willing to spend a little time to learn about the box with a cup holder built into it (CD ROM tray)=0).Anytime I build a computer or reinstall Windows on someone's computer, I always partition the hard drive into C: and D:. Partitioning is the process in which is installing one hard drive and making your computer see itself as having two hard drives. The C drive is always going to be the Primary Partition and the D and any other drive letter is always going to be a Logical Partition. He or she can use the FDISK utility in a Windows 98 Boot up floppy (XP already has the utility in the install cd and will ask if you want to create partitions)to create two partitions in one hard drive. This is good practice because when something goes wrong with Windows, all the data that's saved in the D drive is in tact since Windows is installed in the C drive (remember, your computer is thinking that it has two hard drives instead of one).Another good practice is to buy an external hard drive, Zip, or a tape drive depending on how large your data is, to have extra backup just in case, which is rare but does happen, the partition gets corrupted and the Logical drive is no longer there. I always tell my clients to save data that is critical to be on an external drive and to turn it off or at least take the connection out from the computer after every backup session, so that in case there's a total system crash, or a hacker getting into the system, the data is not there to be damaged or tampered with.

How To Choose A Flow Meter, Easily

A flow meter is necessary for the task at hand. You know that. What you do not know is how to choose the right one for your task. But, there are some very good tools to help you decide. First of all, a flow meter is a device that is used to measure liquid or a gas in linear, nonlinear, mass or volumetric rates. Now, on to selecting the right flow meter for the task ahead!Here are some things to consider about your needs that will lead you to choosing the proper flow meter. What type of fluid will you measure? For example, air or water? The flow meters will depend on this information. Totalization or rate measurement? It depends on what you need here. What is the viscosity of the liquid? This is assuming that it is not water. Will the fluid that you need to measure be clean? Local display or an electronic signal output? Which is the preferred choice here, or perhaps the necessary choice? What is the flow rate maximum and minimum for the flow meter? What is the max and the min for the process pressure?From this point, you will want to make sure that the flow meter that you choose fits with the specification that you have listed. It can be quite simple to find the product that you need especially when you make your purchase through the web.There are many information portals now devoted to the subject and we recommend reading about it at one of these. Try googling for flow meter info and you will be surprised by the abundance of information on the subject. Alternatively you may try looking on Yahoo, MSN or even a decent directory site, all are good sources of this information.

Summary

Computers continually give out small quantities of irritating and poisonous materials. This article explains how exposure risks can be reduced.